The Bedley Bros Help Break Big Google News


Mike Lawrence, CEO of CUE, and Steve Hargadon, founder of Classroom 2.0, will be piloting a new Google for Education online training program for teachers. Listen in to learn more from these EdTech pioneers!

 

The Bedley Bros Ep 40: Jamie Ewing


On this week’s show, Scott and I welcome Jamie Ewing, a 5th grade Google Certified teacher from Washington. Jamie shares ideas to innovate in the classroom: coding, Common Core, and integrating science. You will be inspired and ready to try something innovative after watching this engaging interview with Jamie Ewing.

Show Notes

Follow Jamie on Twitter

Scratch Coding Site

Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper

Google + Connected Classrooms

 

The Bedley Bros #EdChat Ep 34: David Theriault & Sean Ziebarth


Sean Ziebarth and David Theriault are high school teachers on a mission. They are connected to other educators on social media and believe in engaging their students in outside the box activities. Tune in to this special Halloween episode as David, Sean, Scott and I discuss topics like blogging, music, and student centered education. This is probably our zaniest show yet. Enjoy!

Show Notes

Movember

Follow Sean on Twitter

Follow David on Twitter

David’s Blog

Engage NY Common Core Materials

The Bedley Bros #EdChat Ep 32: Dave Burgess


Ahoy! Dave Burgess is the author of the ridiculously popular book Teach Like a Pirate. On today’s show he takes us beyond the pages of his book and challenges us to take student engagement to another level. This episode isn’t for ye land lubbers, so proceed with caution. Aye aye!

 

Show Notes

Dave’s Website

Follow Dave on Twitter

Teach Like a Pirate on Amazon

Chronicles of Narnia as Free Audio Books

The Bedley Bros #EdChat Ep. 28: Vicki Davis


Vicki Davis has so many ideas for the classroom, it will make your head spin! In this episode of the Bedley Bros EdChat, Scott and I are caught in a whirlwind of amazing teaching tips provided by the Cool Cat Teacher. Vicki is a tech teacher in Georgia who is on the cutting edge of effective classroom pedagogy. She is the co-founder of the Flat Classroom and an award-winning blogger. So what did we talk to Vicki about? Whew! Where to start? Just be ready to take some notes.

Show Notes

Follow Vicki on Twitter

Visit Vicki’s Website

Read Vicki’s blog post “10 Ways to be a Terrible Teacher”

Noodle Tools

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The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 26: Catlin Tucker


In the latest episode of the Bedley Bros EdChat, Scott and I learn more about blended learning from one of education’s foremost experts on the subject, Catlin Tucker. Catlin was one of the keynote speakers at last year’s CUE conference in Palm Springs. Catlin will challenge your view of what education should look like. Do your students back channel? Tune in and learn more.

Show Notes

Follow Catlin on Twitter

Catlin’s Website

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The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 23: Shannon Miller


Shannon Miller is probably the most famous librarian on the planet. Shannon is an author, teacher, tech guru, and more. Join my brother Scott and me as we learn from the amazing Shannon Miller!

Show Notes

Shannon Miller’s Website

The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 19: Ramsey Musallam


With almost a half million views to date, Ramsey Musallam’s inspiring message of how he fosters curiousity in his high school students is one of the most popular teacher TED Talks on the Internet. Ramsey sat down with Scott and me to have a casual and candid time talking shop.

Show Notes

Ramsey Musallam’s Blog Cycles of Learning

Infinite Thinking Machine

If This Then That (IFTTT)

Curiosity Article from Stanford

The End of Molasses Classes by Ron Clark

 

 

The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 18: Kyle Pace


Scott and I had a great discussion with Kyle Pace about effective professional development and Google Apps. Kyle is on the cutting edge of EdTech and trains teachers throughout the United States. This is one episode you won’t want to miss!

Show Notes

Kyle Pace’s Website

Follow Kyle on Twitter

Give Blood, Play Hockey

Common Core Read Aloud Teacher’s Cheat Sheet

 

 

iPad vs. Chromebook




Summary: iPad is still the king of creation tools. Chromebooks are great replacements for laptops due to cloud computing.

I just bought a Chromebook this week so I would know if it was a viable alternative for the iPad in my BYOD classroom. Here are my initial thoughts.

Chromebook Pros 

  1. Light weight: Weighs less than my Griffin encased iPad.
  2. Inexpensive: I paid $199 at Wal-Mart. iPad minis run $329 at time of posting.
  3. Simple to use: Open it up, connect to a wireless, sign in to your Google Account, and your off and running. No Windows OS to make things complicated. Nothing to set up.
  4. Quick on: open it up and it’s on!acer-c7-chromebook-pr
  5. Keyboard: feels right.
  6. Track pad: two finger scrolling, decent size
  7. No case needed: I may change my mind on this, but doesn’t seem as fragile as the iPad.
  8. External ports: 3 USB, Ethernet, and VGA for external monitor or projector. iPad has that dongle thing for connecting to projectors but it pops out super easily.
  9. Can create/edit using Google Apps. You may only work on Docs and Spreadsheets when using an iPad.
  10. A ton of free apps available through the Chrome Store.
  11. Can play Flash.

iPad Pros

  1. WAY more educational apps: Games, student response apps, utilities, etc. 
  2. Two Cameras: Front facing and back side. Chromebook only has the front facing.
  3. Creativity: Video, photography, stop motion, etc. The only way I can see to do this on Chromebook is to use the front facing camera, which would be super tricky.
  4. Drawing: Use a stylus and draw on the screen, or even use your finger. Chromebooks are track pad or mouse controlled, not touch screen. Drawing would be very hard.iPad
  5. Digital portfolios: I use Three Ring a lot. iPads are perfect for capturing student work samples using the camera and mic.
  6. Stronger speakers: As weak as the speaker is on an iPad, it’s better than a Chromebook. I can barely hear the speakers on the Chromebook.
  7. Display: Greater visibility.
  8. Parental Control: Parents can control a lot through the restriction settings. I don’t see a way to do this with the Chromebook.

Conclusion

I will be recommending devices to families in my BYOD class this next year in the following order of preference:

  1. Latest full-size iPad
  2. Latest mini iPad
  3. Android tablet
  4. Chromebook

If families can only afford a Chromebook, then it is definitely better than nothing. I do NOT see a Chromebook as a replacement for an iPad, but I do think it’s a great replacement for a laptop. I am using my Chromebook right now to write this post. It’s so simple for getting online and keyboard input. It’s not something I see as a creative tool for student projects, other than the fact that students can work on Google Presentations using a Chromebook. I love the fact that the computer is just ON right away, and for those who understand cloud computing, there’s really no reason these days to buy a full-blown computer with a large hard drive. I value your input so please leave a comment.