The Bedley Bros #EdChat Ep 34: David Theriault & Sean Ziebarth


Sean Ziebarth and David Theriault are high school teachers on a mission. They are connected to other educators on social media and believe in engaging their students in outside the box activities. Tune in to this special Halloween episode as David, Sean, Scott and I discuss topics like blogging, music, and student centered education. This is probably our zaniest show yet. Enjoy!

Show Notes

Movember

Follow Sean on Twitter

Follow David on Twitter

David’s Blog

Engage NY Common Core Materials

The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep 31: Genein Letford


Charismatic, humble, and lighthearted, Genein Letford is a finalist for the People Magazine’s Teacher of the Year award. She teaches music in Los Angeles and has received acclaim for her innovative approaches to integrating the arts into the regular ed classroom. It’s another dynamic episode of the Bedley Bros. EdChat! Free PD baby!

Show Notes

Genein Letford on Twitter

American Teacher book

The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 26: Catlin Tucker


In the latest episode of the Bedley Bros EdChat, Scott and I learn more about blended learning from one of education’s foremost experts on the subject, Catlin Tucker. Catlin was one of the keynote speakers at last year’s CUE conference in Palm Springs. Catlin will challenge your view of what education should look like. Do your students back channel? Tune in and learn more.

Show Notes

Follow Catlin on Twitter

Catlin’s Website

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The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep 25: The Two Sisters



Gail Boushey and Joan Moser, real life sisters, are the authors of one of the most popular books for teachers over the past several years, The Daily 5. The Two Sisters impact on teachers reaching well beyond just language arts instruction, but also into classroom management and character development. Scott and Tim engage in a lively discussion with these two down-to-earth powerhouse educators about topics like investing in kids, misconceptions about the Daily 5, and developing student skills to support the common core standards.

Show Notes

The Daily Cafe

The Two Sisters


 

The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 23: Shannon Miller


Shannon Miller is probably the most famous librarian on the planet. Shannon is an author, teacher, tech guru, and more. Join my brother Scott and me as we learn from the amazing Shannon Miller!

Show Notes

Shannon Miller’s Website

The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 16: Rebecca Wildman and Fred Sitkins



Teacher Rebecca Wildman and her principal Fred Sitkins are changing the face of education through their use of iTunes U for elementary students in Michigan and around the world. Watch as they explain the endless possibilities of this eduawesome platform.


Show Notes

iPad PD Rebecca and Fred’s website where they house their iTunes U courses and a whole lot more!

Flipping PD in iTunes U

Greg Tang Math

GiveBloodPlayHockey.org

What is a Maker Faire?



Everyone I ask in my neck of the woods, Southern California, has never heard of Maker Faire. On the weekend of May 18-19, my brother Scott and I took a trip to the San Francisco Bay area to visit our very first Maker Faire. We were told that over 150,000 other people would visit the two-day event as well. Hmmmm. So I guess it’s not as big of a secret as many would think!

What we saw blew our minds. What is a Maker Faire? “Maker Faire is the Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth—a family-friendly festival of invention, creativity and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker movement,” says the Maker Faire website. But after seeing it for myself, it’s not something that can be described in words. One must experience it to understand it.

Scott and I, the Bedley Bros., shot a bit of video while at Maker Faire because we love to learn and love to share. So check out our interviews with some of the coolest makers at the faire. In the first video, we talk with Eric Stackpole who created on open source underwater ROV, Shane (high schooler) with First Robotics Competition, David Baszucki of Roblox, Legoscope, and More. The second video features Jay Silver, who created the Makey-Makey, and Andrew H. Petersen of the Drone Dudes.

FaceTime for Absent Students



Last week, Jordan, one of my fifth grade girls, was caught doing something without permission! AND I LOVED IT!

Jordan’s classmate, Koral, was on a trip out of town to attend a funeral. During our book clubs (literature circles), I noticed that Jordan had propped her iPad up in front of her and was talking to Koral on FaceTime. Jordan knew that our class was a safe place to try something new. She also knew that I would approve of anything she did that enriched her education or that of a classmate. So here is Jordan reading Chomp to Koral, separated by a measly 1000 miles.

Book Party!

Students engaged in recommending books to each other during a recent book party.

Students engaged in recommending books to each other during a recent book party.

So what book are you reading these days? And what made you decide to grab that book and read it? Most likely, you heard about it from a trusted friend, relative, or colleague. Do kids recommend books to each other? From my experience, the answer is NO. They aren’t naturally talking about the books they love at recess, on their cells, or online. That’s where you and I come in. We need to provide class time and clear guidance for our students to learn how to recommend books to each other. I train my students at the beginning of the year to record, in their binder or on their iPad, a “Books to Read” list. This list should include the title along with how they can find the book. If it’s in the library, then the author’s last name is usually sufficient. If a friend will loan them the book, then write the friend’s name next to the book title. As students finish reading their current book, they look at their “Books to Read” list to choose a new one.

This is where the Book Party comes in. Students learn to roam around the classroom “party-style” and just informally chat with one another about the books they love. All students must be carrying their list. Students are allowed to gather in groups of 2 or more. The only “rules” for the Book Party is that all students must be either talking about a book they love, listening to someone else talking about a book, or writing down a book recommendation on their “Books to Read” list. One key to helping students to stay focused is for the teacher to constantly scan the room checking for students who appear to be off task. Book parties normally last about 5 minutes. Sometimes, at the end of the book party, I will ask students to hold up the number of fingers to correspond to how many books they added to their list. Here is a brief video peek at my students conducting a book party.

Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 3 – Artist to Classroom Network



In episode three, Tim interviews Scott about a super cool way to get some quality art instruction into your elementary classroom.


Show links:

Christina Song Art Blog

Susan Cain – The Power of Introverts