The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 16: Rebecca Wildman and Fred Sitkins



Teacher Rebecca Wildman and her principal Fred Sitkins are changing the face of education through their use of iTunes U for elementary students in Michigan and around the world. Watch as they explain the endless possibilities of this eduawesome platform.


Show Notes

iPad PD Rebecca and Fred’s website where they house their iTunes U courses and a whole lot more!

Flipping PD in iTunes U

Greg Tang Math

GiveBloodPlayHockey.org

Adding Text to Your QR Codes

By Tim Bedley


PhotoString App well worth 99 cents.

PhotoString App well worth 99 cents.

 

If you’re like me, you love creating QR codes but find it very frustrating to keep track of them because all your QR codes look basically the same. One solution is to use the iPad app PhotoString. The app is designed for making photo montages with text, but I’m using it to label my QR codes. Of course, sometimes you want your QR codes to remain a mystery before they are scanned, but when you don’t, here’s how to label them.

Steps to Create and Label a QR Code

  1. Create the QR code using an app like QRafter or http://goqr.me/ website.
  2. Save the QR code to your photo roll.
  3. Open PhotoString and choose the icon at the bottom that shows one picture with text below.
  4. Import your QR code.
  5. Resize to fit in the window.
  6. Identify the QR code by writing a caption below the code.
  7. Export the finished product back to your photo roll.

Now you can have several QR codes stored on your iPad or computer and actually be able to identify them.

Example of QR Code with caption created using PhotoString

Example of QR Code with caption created using PhotoString

APP-athy

By Tim Bedley

 

What is APP-athy? The point where you just can’t stand the thought of adding one more app to your iPad. There are now over a quarter million iPad apps. It’s impossible to keep up with them all. How many drawing apps do I need? Where did I save that picture of the kids? iCloud? Dropbox? Google Drive? Ugh.

It’s important to stay on top of the latest and greatest; however, there comes a point where the cost of change is not worth the upgrade. There are lesson plans to write, new children’s literature to read, and naps to be taken. Think about how many apps you’ve downloaded that you’ve used only once, or perhaps never at all.

Don’t sweat it. It’s ok that there are new educational apps that you’ve never heard of. If that new app is worth using, it will appear on a top 10 list in the days to come.

What is a quality math game?

By Tim Bedley


What makes a quality educational math game for kids?
A perfect blend of strategy and skills.
Almost every kids’ online math game involves one or the other, but rarely both. Normally, math games involve the player solving a math problem and, if they get the answer correct, they get to play a game.
I make a distinction between a game that makes you smarter and a game that teaches you math.

Angry Birds definitely can improve critical thinking skills along with other brain functions, but does it teach you to solve an actual math problem? Not really.
Sudoku helps the player to learn deductive reasoning. It’s a great thinking game. It involves numbers, but doesn’t teach any actual math that will help a child in school.
Now don’t take me wrong. I think that thinking games are awesome and I encourage my students to play FlowLittle Alchemy, and several other great strategy games. There’s just something beautiful when a game-maker comes up with a strategy game that actually teaches kids math vocabulary or math skills. Calculation Nation is a math game website produced by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM.) All the games (with the exception of Slamball) teach basic math skills while engaging the player in addictive strategy. For example, Times Square requires the player to constantly do multiplication facts in his/her head. Players must also keep track of offensive and defensive moves to obtain 4 in a row.

Another math game website to check out is GregTangMath.com. Greg has developed some excellent thinking games that kids love. My favorite game is Kakooma.

Another aspect of math games that I desire for my kids is the ability to play another real live kid. This makes the game much more exciting. Calculation Nation offers this option.
What are your favorite digital math games?