The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 21: Gene Bedley


The Bedley Bros. have finally reached the pinnacle of education rock stars. This week, we interview our dad, Gene Bedley. Dad was honored as the PTA National Educator of the Year in 1985. He is the Executive Director of the National Character Education Center. Our dad’s innovative work in values-based education has brought him national and international acclaim and recognition by receiving the Rotary, Paul Harris National Outstanding Educator Award and the prestigious Milken Family Foundation National Award for his work in value-based education. The Bureau of Education’s presented Dad with the National Distinguished Teacher Award for his work in character development and school discipline.

He has been described as a Catalyst, Climate Creator, “Value Driven” educator with a compelling message for Americas teachers, parents, and children. Dad Bedley believes that responsibility is the foundational value of all the core values. As a learning behavior strategist, he has trained over 3,000,000 educators from around the world and his Values in Action! Program is in over 25,000 schools worldwide.

But most importantly, he’s a great dad.


The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 10: Rick Morris


The Bedley Bros. have a sit-down with the guru of classroom management and instructional strategies, Rick Morris. He shares thoughts on the Independent Classroom Culture, “happy productive.” Rick believes that classrooms are not going to be truly happy places unless the students operate independently.

Rick Morris’s Website “New Management”

 

The Bedley Bros. #EdChat Ep. 9: Interview with Alex Kajitani



Watch Alex’s engaging discussion with Tim and Scott on the latest episode of The Bedley Bros. EdChat. Alex, the 2009 California Teacher of the Year, shares ideas from his new book Teacher of the Year Handbook. Both of the Bedley Bros. also share a quick tip for teachers. Whether or not you are in the running for Teacher of the Year, educators will benefit from this lively interview with the Rappin’ Mathematician.

Show Notes

Teacher of the Year Handbook

Rappin’ Mathematician

Alex on Twitter

Super Spies: Quick and Simple Super Classroom Behavior



As students work in groups, designate one or more students to silently observe the workers. Call them the Super Spies. The Super Spies silently take notes on positive behaviors and then report what they saw to the class. The teacher should be the first Super Spy to model the types of behaviors that should be reported. It’s quick, it’s simple, and it works wonders.

Hannah as a Super Spy

Hannah as a Super Spy

Super Spy Melody

Super Spy Melody

 

 

Cameron takes notes as a Super Spy

Cameron takes notes as a Super Spy

 

Watch as Super Spies report positive behaviors to class.

Less teacher talk means better student behavior

By Tim Bedley

2012-12-13 14.30.54Have you been around teachers who constantly yack at their students? Give them command after command after command? Have you noticed students in these classes tend to misbehave more?

Teachers with effective classroom discipline choose their words carefully and use as few of them as possible. Commands are brief and used only when essential.

Of course, classroom discipline is extremely complex and cannot be narrowed down to one factor, but a teacher who understands this concept will increase her effectiveness.

Train your students in classroom procedures instead of relying on spur-of-the-moment teacher directives. Use gestures to signal your kids. Be careful, or you will become the voice of Charlie Brown’s teacher and your students will tune you out.

Why do you shake with respect when a police officer walks up to your window? “Do you know why I pulled you over? License and registration.” Imagine a police officer standing on the corner incessantly lecturing everyone that went by. The effect would be greatly diminished.

Classroom Snippets:

  • The teacher wants a student from across the room to close the door. She looks at the student and makes a swinging door motion with her hand and then points to the door.
  • The students come in the room loudly after lunch. Instead of giving the kids a big lecture about how many times they’ve been told, the teacher says, “Our class comes into buildings silently. Go outside and do it correctly.”
  • Several students turned in math papers without names. Instead of berating the class for their laziness, the teacher says, “Please stand if I say your name.” After reading all the names from the math papers, the teacher says, “These students followed directions by putting their names on their math papers. Go take a ticket.” Then the teacher lays the remaning papers on the floor and points to them while looking at the class.
  • A student is talking instead of working independently. The teacher calls the student’s name, beckons the student, and then says, “Sit up here and do your work.”

Watch a video of Tim teaching.